Mourning the Passing of Cathleen McFarlane Ross

I read this last week about the passing of Cathleen McFarlane Ross. Though I couldn’t count her as a personal friend, I met her on many occasions and am sorry that I was not in a position to have known her better. She was always cheerful and struck me as a woman that was not afraid of anything. Back in the 80s we were both house hunting at the same time and I remember looking at the house she would eventually purchase. She had such a great sense of flare, drama, and beauty, whether it was designing a home or in her appearance she always showed her best side. However, when I was reading the article about her life, the fact that she had memorized the poem “Invictus” by William Ernest Henley (1849-1903) truly resonated with me. It is a poem that I believe must have described her attitude about life to the core.

In my last blog I mentioned my favorite poem book, “One Thousand and One Famous Peoms.” One of my own favorite poems among many in that tomb is “Invictus.” I think it is apropos to try and gain meaning from this incredible poem considering the world we find ourselves with its many disappointments, tragedies, and reversal of fortunes. In honor of a great woman and for your pleasure and inspiration…

Invictus

Out of the night that covers me,

Black as the Pit from pole to pole,

I think whatever gods may be

For my unconquerable soul.

In the fell clutch of circumstance

I have not winced not cried aloud.

Under the bludgeonings of chance

My head is bloody, but unbowed.

Beyond this place of wrath and tears

Looms but the horror of the shade,

And yet the menace of the years

Finds, and shall find me, unafraid.

It matters not how strait the gate,

How charged with punishments the scroll,

I am the master of my fate;

I am the captain of my soul.

I read this last week about the passing of Cathleen McFarlane Ross. Though I couldn’t count her as a personal friend, I met her on many occasions and am sorry that I was not in a position to have known her better. She was always cheerful and struck me as a woman that was not afraid of anything. Back in the 80s we were both house hunting at the same time and I remember looking at the house she would eventually purchase. She had such a great sense of flare, drama, and beauty, whether it was designing a home or in her appearance she always showed her best side. However, when I was reading the article about her life, the fact that she had memorized the poem “Invictus” by William Ernest Henley (1849-1903) truly resonated with me. It is a poem that I believe must have described her attitude about life to the core.

In my last blog I mentioned my favorite poem book, “One Thousand and One Famous Peoms.” One of my own favorite poems among many in that tomb is “Invictus.” I think it is apropos to try and gain meaning from this incredible poem considering the world we find ourselves with its many disappointments, tragedies, and reversal of fortunes. In honor of a great woman and for your pleasure and inspiration…

Invictus

Out of the night that covers me,

Black as the Pit from pole to pole,

I think whatever gods may be

For my unconquerable soul.

In the fell clutch of circumstance

I have not winced not cried aloud.

Under the bludgeonings of chance

My head is bloody, but unbowed.

Beyond this place of wrath and tears

Looms but the horror of the shade,

And yet the menace of the years

Finds, and shall find me, unafraid.

It matters not how strait the gate,

How charged with punishments the scroll,

I am the master of my fate;

I am the captain of my soul.

I read this last week about the passing of Cathleen McFarlane Ross. Though I couldn’t count her as a personal friend, I met her on many occasions and am sorry that I was not in a position to have known her better. She was always cheerful and struck me as a woman that was not afraid of anything. Back in the 80s we were both house hunting at the same time and I remember looking at the house she would eventually purchase. She had such a great sense of flare, drama, and beauty, whether it was designing a home or in her appearance she always showed her best side. However, when I was reading the article about her life, the fact that she had memorized the poem “Invictus” by William Ernest Henley (1849-1903) truly resonated with me. It is a poem that I believe must have described her attitude about life to the core.

In my last blog I mentioned my favorite poem book, “One Thousand and One Famous Peoms.” One of my own favorite poems among many in that tomb is “Invictus.” I think it is apropos to try and gain meaning from this incredible poem considering the world we find ourselves with its many disappointments, tragedies, and reversal of fortunes. In honor of a great woman and for your pleasure and inspiration…

Invictus

Out of the night that covers me,

Black as the Pit from pole to pole,

I think whatever gods may be

For my unconquerable soul.

In the fell clutch of circumstance

I have not winced not cried aloud.

Under the bludgeonings of chance

My head is bloody, but unbowed.

Beyond this place of wrath and tears

Looms but the horror of the shade,

And yet the menace of the years

Finds, and shall find me, unafraid.

It matters not how strait the gate,

How charged with punishments the scroll,

I am the master of my fate;

I am the captain of my soul.